Alma Jeppson

Alma Jeppson was born in Sugarhouse, Utah. He is the Founder and CEO of Landmark Home Warranty located in Salt Lake City, Utah. Founded in 2004. Landmark was recognized as one of the fastest growing private companies in the U.S. by Inc 500/5000 in 2013. Landmark has grown over 200% since 2012, and 400% since 2011. Recently, Landmark expanded to Texas and Oregon, and is planning to enter Nevada in the third quarter 2014.

Mr. Jeppson Personal Background

As the dedicated Founder and CEO of Landmark, Alma Jeppson grew up in Sugarhouse, Utah. Mr. Jeppson spent most of his childhood working to financially support his mother’s home. He is not driven by money, but is driven by the joy of seeing others succeed on the job and in their families. He enjoys the greatest satisfaction in life of sending his employees on a dream vacation with their families. Early on in Mr. Jeppson’s childhood he recognized that if he wanted anything out of life, then he had to go out and work for it. Growing up wasn’t easy for Mr. Jeppson, at a young age he held a paper route, worked at Hunan Gardens as a waiter and at the age of 13 he was a gravedigger at Larkin Mortuary. He began high school at Highland High, but never finished, Mr. Jeppson struggled emotionally and spiritually as a teenager trying to understand life. Alma Jeppson Founder, Owner & CEO, Landmark Home Warranty 2 He was called to serve on an LDS mission in Santiago, Chile and on this mission he developed the ability to create goals and a vision for what he wanted out of life. He understood values and what it meant to spiritually push further than what he thought possible. This mission was a life-changing event for him and upon his return from Santiago, Chile, he began implementing the values he had learned into his day-to-day activities.

Mr. Jeppson Work Experience

As a returned missionary Mr. Jeppson started working in the telecom industry with McLeod USA and as an Account Manager he was given the responsibility to up scale services provided to McLeod’s clients. He studied the ways of the CEOs and how they communicated to their employees and he studied what made the employees excited that kept them working with that employer. Mr. Jeppson soon become business partners with a man from Texas. However, it wasn’t long before Mr. Jeppson recognized the business partner from Texas had been previously kicked out of doing business with other states for dishonest practices. It was tough realizing the business relationship he had built with a dishonest person. He struggled spiritually and personally as to how he should deal with this conflict. His family had become very good friends with this business partner. Mr. Jeppson decided to leave the business relationship and start his own company.

Establishing Landmark Warranty

By 26 years old Mr. Jeppson decided to create his own business of providing auto warranties, with literally no money behind his name, he recognized the value for establishing credibility and confidence with bankers. Funding the business of personal credit cards, unsecured lines of credit and a new business partner, Mr. Jeppson established Landmark Warranty in 2004. 3 He began calling dealerships to sell warranty parts, he struggled in finding success selling to dealerships. During this struggle Mr. Jeppson was laid off from McLeod and subsequently recruited by Echelon doing door-to-door sales. This was tough for him as he wasn’t a door-todoor salesman, but he did value the experience. He had failed at his auto warranty business and his child had been diagnosed with a congenital heart disease. Through the support of his wife he decided to go into the home warranty’s business. He had very little knowledge in the industry, but he started researching the basics in becoming a home warranty representative. He researched the challenges for competing in the business and he started finding things out and discovering processes that he could make better in the industry, he created the “welcome call” to new homebuyers and he started doing referrals. Mr. Jeppson completed his first sale in September 2005, he strove to show his clients that he would work his tail off to provide exceptional service, while still working with Echelon at the time. Landmark was dirt poor, struggling and scrapping to get by in the early stages of business, but by 2007 the playing field began changing and Landmark was operating profitably until the 2008 recession. At the height of the 2008 Landmark was losing $60,000 per month. Upon reading an article by Proctor and Gamble about its approach during time of recession, he recognized the value of flooding the markets with a marketing campaign. Landmark quickly revamped its marketing budget and started dipping into its line of credit to finance its marketing campaigns and ultimately, this increased Landmarks revenue by 10% over its 2007 revenue figures. Landmark has nearly 80 employees and 13 sales reps across five states. It understands the value of its employees and the personal sacrifices they go through.

Future Business Development

Mr. Jeppson’s business philosophy is that he doesn’t tell his employees what to do, rather he talks about different ideas and provides suggestions to what employees should do. He surrounds himself with the most value-centered individuals and operates on three essential values. 1. The Landmark Family. Landmark and its employees are all family. They work together as a family toward the same goal of providing excellent service to clients. 2. Professional plate Spinners. Landmark doesn’t ask its employees to be perfect in every aspect of their job. What they ask is for an employee to never let a “plate fall.” It encourages employees to be involved in the community. 3. It is not all about work. There is a life beyond Landmark. Landmark works strenuously to support its employees and in return the employees return excellent service to Landmark clients. Technology and customer response times are the biggest inhibitors to Landmark’s future growth. Landmark’s marketing is dialed in to provide the best quality of service to Landmark’s clients. Ultimately Mr. Jeppson wants Landmark to be known by “through Landmark Warranty thousands of lives were blessed, beyond that nothing else really matters. I care about people and try to be a part of changing lives.”

Comments are closed.